Arrow Fat Left Icon Arrow Fat Right Icon Arrow Right Icon Cart Icon Close Circle Icon Expand Arrows Icon Facebook Icon Instagram Icon Twitter Icon Hamburger Icon Information Icon Down Arrow Icon Mail Icon Mini Cart Icon Person Icon Ruler Icon Search Icon Shirt Icon Triangle Icon Bag Icon Play Video
  • Brewing up a braggot with Brewdog
  • Post author
    Tom Gosnell

Brewing up a braggot with Brewdog

Brewing up a braggot with Brewdog

First off some jargon: 

Braggot 

NOUN

A form of mead or beer made with half honey, and half malted barley

So there we have it, a braggot is a half beer, half mead hybrid. We’d always thought about making one, after all with so many friends at craft breweries in London it was only natural.

So, when Josh at Brewdog Tower Hill, London got in touch to talk about an oak aged collaboration, we knew it had to be a braggot.

We were very excited to go and brew with their shiny new kit in the bar at Tower Hill – it’s bigger than some of the breweries we’ve been in, and certainly shinier! 

We had an awesome day talking to Josh about the brew, and certainly learnt a lot more about beer brewing than we knew before.

After a lot of discussions, we decided to go for a lightly hopped base beer, primarily comprised of pilsner malt, with some flaked oats and wheat for structure. After this was complete we made a batch of mead, made with our orange blossom honey. 

We then mixed the two together in a foeder (a "foo-der" is a long, large barrel, in this case, 2000 litres) and pitch the Brewdog house yeast. The braggot was left to ferment out in the foeder, and remained in contact with the wood for 108 days!

It’s been really interesting (and fun!) to pop into BD TH and taste the beer as it’s evolved over the past 3 months – tasting the oaked notes coming out and the sweetness drop has been fascinating.

We're launching this at the meadery on 23rd November - see here for more details! 

 

Our first braggot in tank

So many shiny fermenters!

The mash tun

Discussing malt

Our braggot in the foeder

  • Post author
    Tom Gosnell